In the Park – Sunday & Monday

Into Sefton Park for the third day of this weekend’s big event in the Liverpool International Music Festival. And today has dawned perfect and sunny as the organisers must have dreamed and wished for.

So, not many words today, let’s just drift around a perfect late summer day.

Down Greenbank Lane and into the Park.

Down Greenbank Lane and into the Park.Sunday02

Big crowds today.

And the Park looks radiant

And the Park looks radiant.

Up to the It's Liverpool stage first.

Up to the It’s Liverpool stage first.

Where I come upon what appear to be four Cistercian monks.

Where I come upon what appear to be four Cistercian monks.

Silly me, they're Druids.

Silly me, they’re Druids.

Introducing ‘Bonnacons of Doom.’ When I arrive I think they’re just finishing, building up to a fiercely thrashing finalé. But for the next 20 minutes they keep building. A small child near me is taken elsewhere to have his tantrum. He can’t compete with the density of the psychedelic sounds coming from the stage.

A wonderful noise, though I’m not sure I’d have them round to the house. Think Mogwai for people who think Mogwai are a bit ambient.

The Brouhaha giants pass by.

The Brouhaha giants pass by.

Such a perfect day, continual singing down on the Bandstand.

On to the main Review Field for World Music Day.

The field looks like a small city, I don’t think I’ve ever seen it so full.

Camping out in style.

Camping out in style.

Considerable style.

Considerable style.

From the stage, the sound of Ireland.

From the stage, the sound of Ireland.

The Padraig Rynee Quartet.

The Padraig Rynne Quartet.

The good natured crowd applauding every uilleann pipe and concertina solo.

Not keen on the term ‘World Music’ myself, all music coming from somewhere in the world. I think what people mean is ‘a bit different and not rock-based.’ OK.

Meanwhile official Festival photographer Mark McNulty appears to be everywhere.

Meanwhile official Festival photographer Mark McNulty appears to be everywhere.

And the idyllic day continues.

And the idyllic day continues.

Families bask in the long afternoon.

Families bask in the long afternoon.

And the children play.

And the children play.

Sunday22Sunday23Sunday24Sunday25

Back on It's Liverpool 'Ghostchant.'

Back on It’s Liverpool is ‘Ghostchant.’

Sunday28

The idyll continues.

The idyll continues.

Tremendous Senegal energy on the World Stage from Les Fréres Guissé.

Tremendous Senegal energy on the World Stage from Les Fréres Guissé.

Though there's been a change in one of the Fréres since last time I saw them.

Though there’s been a change in one of the Fréres since last time I saw them.

Sunday31

Yards away from the excitement, the park dreams on.

Yards away from the excitement, the park dreams on.

I’d been mildly worried about the Portico Quartet. I listen to them quite a lot and thought they might not be quite right for following Les Fréres Guissé, too gentle?

I needn't have worried.

I needn’t have worried.

They'd left their gentility back home in East London.

They’d left their gentility back home in East London.

And out-blissed the blessed-out crowd.

And out-blissed the blessed-out crowd.

Sunday37

The Portico Quartet.

The Portico Quartet.

After this I was done. The music wouldn’t be for another couple of hours, but I was well sated.

This was a perfect day in what’s turning out to be a huge and perfect event, perfectly done. I know I wasn’t too taken with elements of the classical evening, but nearly everyone else was. So this first Liverpool International Music Festival’s centrepiece in Sefton Park represents a considerable triumph for everyone involved in its organisation. Well done all of you.

And during the day I met one of these people, Clare McColgan, Liverpool City’s Director of Culture and told her what I thought.

Well done Clare.

Well done Clare.

Monday then, and the weather is even better The Liverpool Echo estimates 60,000 people turn up in the park. How they do this I’ve no idea, but it is fuller than I’ve ever seen it. Even the Bunnymen  and Frankie Goes to Hollywood back in the 80s didn’t pull in crowds like this for the fabled ‘Larks in the Park.’

This photo of the Park, taken from one of the tower blocks off Ullet Road starts circulating on Twitter.

Yes, it's full.

Yes, it’s full. Photo, I think, by Marvin Heron.

First up is ‘The New Merseybeat.’ With Picture Book performing the song they created specially for this wonderful Liverpool International Music Festival film.

And great to see Lizzie Nunnery up with Picture Book. On the main stage where she belongs.

And great to see Lizzie Nunnery up with Picture Book. On the main stage where she belongs.

Over on the It's Liverpool stage, Liverpool blues legend Connie Lush.

Over on the It’s Liverpool stage, Liverpool blues legend Connie Lush.

Back in the big field.

Back in the big field.

The Christians launch into 'Greenbank Drive' - one of my favourite songs.

The Christians launch into ‘Greenbank Drive’ – one of my favourite songs.

I can’t stay for the whole of their set, but you can find a full review of it by Gerry over on ‘That’s How The Light Gets In.’

And why can’t I stay? Because this lot are about to start on the other stage.

Deaf School.

Deaf School.

And what I then see is a performance so special that it’s going to get its own post.

A performance so special, in fact, that it tops off the whole Festival for me and I wander off to Sarah’s allotment, just next to the Park, where Soul II Soul are clearly heard, if not seen.

Wonderful, halcyon days. And once again well done to everyone who organised it, with special thanks to Yaw Owusu, the Music Curator. Good job. We loved it.

Download the full programme here.

4 thoughts on “In the Park – Sunday & Monday

  1. Gerry

    A brilliant day for sure – Les Fréres Guissé were excellent. It’s becoming apparent how well organised the whole thing has been. Off to see the Christians now.

    Reply

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