Haar at Ynys Llanddwyn

We’ve often written about our Friday Walks, but this one’s a special Tuesday Walk. Special because it takes place on Sarah’s birthday.

We set off mid-morning to drive round the north coast of Wales to one of our favourite places.

And the forecast for a sunny day seemed to be working out.

And the forecast for a sunny day seems to be working out.

Until we got closer to Anglesey, our destination.

Until we get closer to Anglesey, our destination.

Fog warnings.

Known variously as a haar, a sea mist , a sea fret. We don’t know it yet but we’ve seen our last clear blue sky of the day.

We travel on, through Newburgh, to our destination.

We travel on, through Newborough, to our destination.

And at this stage, as the high tide begins to turn, it looks like we might yet be walking on a sunny beach.

And at this stage, as the high tide begins to turn, it looks like we might yet be walking on a sunny beach.

Still able to peer through the mist, across the bay to Snowdonia.

Still able to peer through the mist, across the bay to Snowdonia.

The one on the left is Yr Wyddfa, Snowdon.

The one in the centre left is Yr Wyddfa, Snowdon.

And haar or no haar this is a staggeringly beautiful place.Haar08Haar09One of our favourite places on Earth. Over the years we have come here for peace, for reflection and for the simple joy of seeing nature at its most magnificent. Once we stood here, rooted to the spot, watching a mighty black rainstorm sweep towards us from Snowdonia. Still rooted seconds later as it hit us both full in the face and soaked us to our skins. Elemental.

Sarah does what she does on a beach. Takes her boots off, walks into the water and starts looking for shells.

Sarah does what she does on a beach. Takes her boots off, walks into the water and starts looking for shells.

Looking towards the destination of our walk, Ynys Llanddwyn, the haar is thickening.

Looking towards the destination of our walk, Ynys Llanddwyn, the haar is thickening.

Undeterred, brave Sarah walks into the mist, as if off the edge of the known universe.

Undeterred, brave Sarah walks into the mist, as if off the edge of the known universe.

And for a warm day, it's strangely cold in here, and our hair is soon wet from the cloud we're walking in.

And for a warm day, it’s strangely cold in here, and our hair is soon wet from the cloud we’re walking in.

Reaching the island, the receding tide is only just clearing the channel for us to walk across.

Reaching the island, the receding tide is only just clearing the channel for us to walk across.

And before we get there Sarah would like you to know that one of her birthday presents has come with her on the walk.

A new camera. Waterproof and, apparently, very good on the kind of microscopic close-ups Sarah loves to take.

A new camera. Waterproof and, apparently, very good on the kind of microscopic close-ups Sarah loves to take.

Like this algae on the rocks.

Like this algae on the rocks.

A type of Euphorbia, probably Sun Spurge.

A type of Euphorbia, probably Sea Spurge.

Sand, very, very close-up.

Sand. Very, very close-up.

This side of the island is sheltered from the Irish Sea, forming a still lagoon.

Quietly peaceful on this foggy day.

Quietly peaceful on this foggy day.

Sarah walks peacefully through the still water. Having a happy birthday.

Sarah walks peacefully through the still water. Having a happy birthday.

Before we’d left the house earlier on, our friend Sarah Jones, having read the ‘Enjoy every sandwich’ post, came round with something she thought would go well on our walk after any sandwiches.

A raspberry and white chocolate tart.

A raspberry and white chocolate tart.

Well, obviously there are two really, but because Sarah has done so much bending down to look at shells and wildflowers, only mine is fit to be photographed by this stage. But they both taste wonderful, so thank you very much Sarah.

We walk on.

Along to the misty far end of the island

Along to the misty far end of the island

A feast for geologists, if we were geologists. Jasper?

A feast for geologists, if we were geologists. Jasper?

And we take the picture we always take here.

Today, dramatic and mysterious.

Today, dramatic and mysterious.

Using our memories to imagine what we are not seeing.

Using our memories to imagine what we are not seeing.

Up in this misty, Celtic place.

Up in this misty, Celtic place.

Smiling through the mist anyway.

Smiling through the mist anyway.

Walking back along the beach Sarah makes a special birthday plea for the sun to break through.

Walking back along the beach Sarah makes a special birthday plea for the sun to break through.

It doesn't.

It doesn’t.

And it doesn’t matter. Though there have been a few other people around, the haar has sealed us all in quiet private places. And helped us to see this familiar place in a new light. Having thought of this as a walk about views, we’ve experienced it today as a more intense, closely focussed walk. Focussing in on the details of us and here and now. Much like Sarah’s new camera.

The happy day finishes along the coast, with chips at Rhosneigr. Where there is no hair

The happy day finishes along the coast, with chips at Rhosneigr. Where there is no haar.

Happy birthday to you.

Happy birthday to you.

Then home with Sarah's shells.

Then home with Sarah’s shells.

See here for us walking to Ynys Llanddwyn on a clear day. Also big thanks to Gerry of ‘That’s How the Light Gets In’ for writing about Ynys Llanddwyn recently and reminding us that we hadn’t been here this year.

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