Autumn Observations

A beautiful early Autumn day. Clothes are changing now. Socks and boots are back on and layers brought, if not worn all the time. A new autumnal fleece, deep red, in my bag.

The air smells different as I enter the parks. Cooler, autumnal. The falling has begun, the dieback. I love the seasons changing, rejoice in the fact that I live somewhere with four distinct seasons.Autumn01 Autumn02There are new students here, wondering ‘Where’s the lake?’ I envy their discoverings but not their youth. I love my ageing in this place, nearly 40 years now of walking through its seasons.

Cherry.

Cherry.

Autumn04

A gentle browning round the lake.

A gentle browning round the lake.

Horse Chestnut.

Horse Chestnut.

Leaving Sefton Park.

Leaving Sefton Park.

Hawthorne at Aigburth Vale.

Hawthorne at Aigburth Vale.

Down into Otterspool Park.

Down into Otterspool Park.

The pathway through Otterspool follows the bed of a river, long since culverted. But just on the left here, for a few yards between culverts you can see it.

Along the autumn red river bed.

Along the autumn red river bed.

In the quiet beauty of the afternoon.

In the quiet beauty of the afternoon.

Crunching underfoot.

Crunching underfoot.

Flowing on.

Flowing on.

Between deep riverbanks.

Emerging where the house used to stand.

Emerging where the house used to stand.

Otterspool House, once the home of slave-owner John Moss.

Otterspool House, once the home of slave-owner John Moss.

Up the steps that used to lead you to the back of the house.

Up the steps that used to lead you to the back of the house.

And on to Otterspool Promenade. Constructed from the rocks extracted from under the river when the Mersey Tunnel was being built in the early 1930s.

And on to Otterspool Promenade. Constructed from the rocks extracted from under the river when the Mersey Tunnel was being built in the early 1930s.

I sit a while and read. And as the afternoon cools my new fleece gets put on.

Late in the day I leave the river behind.

Late in the day I leave the river behind.

Heading back through the autumn parklands to Plot 44, Sarah’s Allotment. Where there are also Autumn Observations to be made.

Pyracanthus, Firethorn.

Pyracanthus, Firethorn.

Berries on the Dogwood.

Berries on the Dogwood.

The Dogwood.

The Dogwood.

Sedum, Ice Plant.

Sedum, Ice Plant.

Marigolds, with Mustard behind.

Marigolds, with Mustard behind.

Goose-Necked, Loose Strife.

Goose-Necked, Loose Strife.

As the darkness began to arrive, Sarah lights a small fire. And we sit here reading until the night comes.Autumn26

Then it is now.

10 thoughts on “Autumn Observations

  1. Taffy

    Lovely photos. I always like to read your excellent blog. Very uplifting. The old brook that once ran through Otterspool Park was at one time named the River Jordan by newly settling Puritan Christians of the early 17th C. The brook formed the boundary between the townships of Toxteth and Garston. An old stone marking this boundary is to be found outside the Boots the Chemist Shop on Ashfield Rd. It simply states TTP : TG

    Reply
  2. Jan Hasak

    What beautiful portraits of autumn in England, Ronnie. I’m surely enjoying the change in California. While we can still wear sandals here, I prefer socks and boots. It’s time to embrace the colour and coolness that fall brings on.

    Reply
  3. Jane Little-Smith

    I once was a new student exploring the parks of Liverpool, spent many a day walking through Sefton Park though all the seasons. Now 14yrs on I explore many Liverpool parks on foot or by bike some much to see and always delightful

    Reply

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