Who knows where the time goes?

What a day. Blue skies, low angled autumn sunlight, perfect for filming.

Which is what we were doing. Both together on a job out filming in Anfield this morning, then the city, then Huskisson Street. Which suddenly breaks down. Someone doesn’t turn up. Someone else pulls out. So come early this afternoon our filming for the day is done, work prematurely over.Who knows01

What shall we do? Find some other work to be done or go to Plot 44, Sarah’s allotment?

Well, time is always precious, but on such a day it seems doubly so. So in true ‘What would you do if you had a year to live?‘ mode, we go to the allotment.

The golden autumn pavement of Greenbank Drive.

The golden autumn pavement of Greenbank Drive.

Every day now there are more leaves down than yesterday.
Every day now there are more leaves down than yesterday.

Welcome to the Socialist-Feminist Republic of Plot 44.

Welcome to the Socialist-Feminist Republic of Plot 44.

Where you are welcome in.

Where you are welcome in.

And you are watched by the Watchers.

And you are watched by the Watchers.

They are here all the time. Watching the feral cats who come just after we go to eat the food Sarah leaves for them. Watching too the family of robins who appear from their nest at the Far End. And watching the fox, greying and shy, who gracefully shares the space while we’re not using it. The Watchers see everything.

The sunlight in the grasses.

The sunlight in the grasses.

The old pots broken by time and frost.

The old pots broken by time and frost.

Marigold.

Marigolds.

The last of the lavender, favourite of the bees.

The last of the lavender, favourite of the bees.

But now the bees have their yellow Mahonia, just coming out.

But now the bees have their yellow Mahonia, just coming out.

And here is a bee.

And here is a bee.

The Gunnera in the bog at the Far End, dying back.

The Gunnera in the bog at the Far End, dying back.

Brightly fading.

Brightly fading.

While Fatsia is beginning its late flowering.

While Fatsia from Japan is beginning its late flowering.

The Dogwood hedge.

The Dogwood hedge.

Full of berries.

Full of berries.

One red leaf, curling and returning to the earth.One red leaf, curling and returning to the earth.

Whilst next to it a new rose blooms.

Whilst next to it a new rose blooms.

The Magnolia leaves preparing to fall.

The Magnolia leaves preparing to fall.

Ammonite, mesozoic fossils found by Sarah in Dorset. Oldest inhabitants of Plot 44

Ammonites, Mesozoic fossils found by Sarah in Dorset. Oldest inhabitants of Plot 44

A South African guest, Melianthus Major.

A South African guest, Melianthus Major.

Favourite plant of Sarah's Dad, Frank Horton.

Favourite plant of Sarah’s Dad, Frank Horton.

 

An idyllic autumn afternoon on Plot 44.

An idyllic autumn afternoon on Plot 44.

And for us now?

Time for a sit down and a cup of tea.

Time for a sit down and a cup of tea.

Reading about 1957, not long after I arrived for my time on Earth.

Reading about 1957, not long after I arrived for my time on Earth.

Time passes on a glorious afternoon. Time retrieved from working. And who knows where the time goes?

“Across the evening sky, all the birds are leaving, but how can they know it’s time for them to go?”

4 thoughts on “Who knows where the time goes?

  1. Jan Hasak

    “Modernity Britain” sounds intriguing. It’d be interesting to compare the 1957 of Britain with that of the States. Probably a lot of similarities, but, I bet, some interesting differences. Love all those shots. Autumn is a perfect season for filming.

    Reply
    1. Ronnie Hughes Post author

      Differences? Yes, the cities here still had areas of WW2 devastation. Britain had also lost an empire, a fact that has caused a crisis of confidence in the ‘natural’ ruling class the rest of us can still see the effects to this day. And you in America had just invented rock’n’roll and were working hard on soul music. Thank you!

      Reply
  2. Gerry

    Yes – me, too. I had a vague plan to go to FACT for Silver Screen, but instead spent the afternoon giving the dog her walk in Sefton Park and photographing the autumn colours, then down to our plot at Dingle Vale to potter about in the sunshine, gathering leaves to compost and just enjoying the late warmth. Before we get a battering this weekend!

    Reply

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