The Friday Walks: Looking up from life

As you’ll know if you’ve read the previous post this has been, in some ways, a bit of a week. So on a day that promised sunny intervals I felt I could do with a good gentle walk. Starting at the top of Princes Boulevard, then a circular route through Liverpools 8 and 1, back to the beginning.

Often on urban walks I’ll focus on side streets and hidden gems. Today I decide to stick mainly to main roads and maybe see things I’d normally walk or drive past.

Across Princes is Granby. Saved from demolition now. Should be some more news soon.
Across Princes is Granby. Saved from demolition now. Should be some more news soon.
This side's called Princes Road, the other side's Princes Avenue.
This side’s called Princes Road, the other side’s Princes Avenue.
This is known as the 'Welsh Cathedral' - built by Welsh builders you see.
This C of E church is known as the ‘Welsh Cathedral’ – built by Welsh builders you see.

Taken over by some other Christian group a few years ago things are looking pretty desperate in there.
Taken over by some other Christian group a few years ago, things are looking pretty desperate in there.

Next along is the lovely Greek Orthodox church
Next along is the lovely Greek Orthodox church.
On the corner of Princes and Upper Parliament the Cathedral looms.
On the corner of Princes and Upper Parliament the Cathedral looms.

Looking across Catharine Street to lovely Egerton Street. The line of the street entirely spoiled by its 1980s additions along there. Planning must have been asleep that day.Looking across Catharine Street to lovely Egerton Street. The line of the street entirely spoiled by its 1980s additions along there. The City Planning Department must have been asleep that day.

Also on Catharine Street, the lovely Italian Garden at St Philip Neri.
Also on Catharine Street, the lovely Italian Garden at St Philip Neri.
And one of Liverpool's favourite independent pubs and gig venues, The Caledonian.
And one of Liverpool’s favourite independent pubs and gig venues, The Caledonia.
Opposite, in this building that's been empty for years a furniture shop has now opened.
Opposite, in this building that’s been empty for years a furniture shop has now opened.
Obviously betting on the gentrification of Canning to see them through.
Around the corner, the former Oxford Street Maternity Hospital. Now student housing, inevitably.
Around the corner, the former Oxford Street Maternity Hospital. Now student housing, inevitably.
It's the place where our John was born. So was my daughter Clare.
It’s the place where our John was born. So was my daughter Clare.
Round the corner is somewhere that's also very special.
Round the corner is somewhere that’s also very special.
And nearly ready to open.
And nearly ready to open.

Looking up16

This means a great deal to so many of us who miss the old Everyman and its Bistro so much. Here’s our short film of its last day in 2011.

And now it's back.
And now it’s nearly back.

A new Everyman for all of us.
A new Everyman for all of us.
And I understand from people who've been inside that it looks great and oddly familiar. Can't wait.
And I understand from people who’ve been inside that it looks great and feels ‘oddly familiar’. Can’t wait.
Next it's the Catholic Cathedral.
Next it’s the Catholic Cathedral.
A piece of 60s architecture I think works perfectly.
A piece of 60s architecture I think works perfectly.
Frederick Gibberd's beautiful work in stained glass.
Frederick Gibberd’s beautiful work in stained glass.
I begin looking up from my life.
I begin looking up from my life.
Though I have no religious beliefs I find this building inspirational.
Though I have no religious beliefs I find this building inspirational.
And always have.
And always have.

Since I was an altar boy here, at its opening celebrations in 1967.Since I was an altar boy here, at its opening celebrations in 1967.

Leaving the Cathedral, looking along Hope Street.
Leaving the Cathedral, looking along Hope Street at the new Everyman.

Around in Rodney Street, the tomb of William Mackenzie, Victorian civil engineer and gambler. Urban myth says he was buried sitting up at a card table, yeah.
Around in Rodney Street, the tomb of William Mackenzie, Victorian civil engineer and gambler. Urban myth says he was buried sitting up at a card table, yeah.
Arriving at town now, time for some serious looking up.
Arriving at town now, time for some serious looking up.