Walking with a camera

Walking with the camera30Walking with a camera is different from just walking. Me and Sarah found this many years ago when we’d run it as an exercise on the ‘Creativity’ courses we’d run back then. People would notice things they might normally miss and find beauty in unexpected places. Well I’ve carried on with this ‘exercise’ until it’s become a natural part of how I live my life. This blog being full of pictures taken as I’m walking around.

This week it’s been different though. For the first time since nearly the beginning of this century the camera in my hand has changed. The weight of it, the feel of it, the capabilities of it – all different and only just starting to be explored. Since my birthday on Tuesday when it arrived it’s actually come out with its much loved predecessor and worked most days. Good pictures in difficult circumstances inside a variety of people’s living rooms. It’s also been out walking though, and that’s what we’re looking at here.

Friday morning, walking out to work.

Friday morning, walking out to work.

Past the Mystery gates

Past the Mystery gates.

And The Brookhouse.

And The Brookhouse.

Along Smithdown, remembering being there with them at the start of Bulky Bob's.

Along Smithdown, remembering being there with them at the start of Bulky Bob’s.

Along past the Royal.

Along past the Royal.

No longer a pub, but still with the pub's intricate tile work.

No longer a pub, but still with the pub’s intricate tile work.

Past the top of Alderson Road.

Past the top of Alderson Road.

Maybe a cowhouse? Or a smithy or something from our agricultural past?

Into the streets blighted by John Prescott's Housing Market Renewal Initiative.

Into the streets blighted by John Prescott’s Housing Market Renewal Initiative.

Like Underley Street, or all that now remains of it.

Like Underley Street, or all that now remains of it.

Swallowed up by a school. Not by new houses.

Swallowed up by a school. Not by new or even renewed houses.

Looking along where upper Canning used to be, to the Catholic Cathedral.

Looking along where Upper Canning used to be, to the Catholic Cathedral.

At which point my walk paused and my camera came and did some work.

Walking on along the Canning we have left.

Walking on along the Canning we have left.

On a fiercely cold day it was good to get in warm somewhere and have lunch with my Dad at the Quaker Meeting House Café. Warmed up we had a bit of a walk round.

Down to the Pier Head, the Royal Iris in the background.

Down to the Pier Head, the Royal Iris in the background.

Joe Hughes, my Dad.

Joe Hughes, my Dad.

After which we warmed up some more with tea and cake at Rococo in Lord Street. Looking fine after its fire the other week.

Soon after, I got the bus home.

Soon after, I got the bus home.

Then early this afternoon today, Sunday, it was time to take the camera walking again. Over to the Park and to Sarah’s Allotment.

In Greenbank Park, as the light grows longer, the daffodils are fully out now.

In Greenbank Park, as the light grows longer, the daffodils are fully out now.

The swan gliding over the lake.

The swan gliding over the lake.

Watched by the querulous geese.

Watched by the querulous geese.

Over into Sefton Park.

Over into Sefton Park.

By the gaunt winter trees.

By the gaunt winter trees.

Winter reflections.

Winter reflections.

Eros from one side.

Eros from one side.

And the other.

And the other.

Passing a rank of bikes.

Passing a rank of bikes.

Now one of the most common sights in Liverpool.

Now one of the most common sights in Liverpool.

Into Lark Lane.

Into Lark Lane.

Lamps on the gate posts to the Park.

Lamps on the gate posts to the Park.

Come on Keith's. Time to paint that sign.

Come on Keith’s. Time to paint that sign.

Lunch from here. Falafel and hummus wraps. Recommended.

Lunch from here. Falafel and hummus wraps. Recommended.

Back into the park to eat. Near my favourite tree.

Back into the park to eat. Near my favourite tree.

The swamp cypress.

The swamp cypress.

Green winter grasses.

Green winter dogwood.

And flowing water...

And flowing water…

Waterfalling.

Waterfalling.

This is the Upper Brook.

This is the Upper Brook.

It’s already flowed under The Brookhouse, seen earlier. And will now join with the Lower Brook to form the main lake here in Sefton Park. Before flowing, mainly in a culvert now, beneath Otterspool to the Mersey.

A mostly secret river. Beautiful.

A mostly secret river. Beautiful.

Across the Park.

Across the Park.

Past the white trunks of winter.

Past the white trunks of winter.

To Greenback Drive.

To Greenbank Drive.

And the 'Secret Gate' of Greenbank Lane Allotments.

And the ‘Secret Gate’ of Greenbank Lane Allotments.

Soon opened by Sarah.

Soon opened by Sarah.

We go to Plot 44.

We go to Plot 44.

Where me and the new camera go for a walk round.

Sarah's own monkey puzzle tree.

Sarah’s own monkey puzzle tree. L66 on her Monkey Map of all known monkeys.

The ivy.

The ivy.

The mahonia.

The mahonia.

Thew Wollemi Pine.

The Wollemi Pine.

And Bren's here too, chopping wood.

And Bren’s here too, chopping wood.

Sarah's been doing the winter tidying here this week.

Sarah’s been doing the winter tidying here this week.

Many spiders have, temporarily, lost their homes up the sleeves of Sarah’s allotment fleeces and coats.

But the Watchers are keeping their beady eyes on things. Making sure the spiders get a fair deal.

But the Watchers are keeping their beady eyes on things. Making sure the spiders get a fair deal.

And they're watching the first snowdrops coming up too.

And they’re watching the first snowdrops coming up too.

Meanwhile Sarah and Bren are hard at work preparing their Sunday Lunch.

All cooked fresh on the open fire here.

All cooked fresh on the open fire here. They call it ‘firefood’

I’ll occasionally get invited to this, like I was on Christmas Day. But normally on Sundays I’m roaming round the city, like today, with my camera.

It's a collaborative effort.

It’s a collaborative effort.

Though I notice one of them’s always Head Chef and bosses the other one around. Today it’s Sarah’s turn to be in charge. Though last time I was here Bren was handing out the gratuitous insults. They enjoy it tremendously.

Soup to start.

Soup to start.

Criticised for being from a Jamie Oliver recipe. But wolfed down nonetheless.

Criticised for being from a Jamie Oliver recipe. But wolfed down nonetheless.

Then their favourite Lamb Dinner being prepared.

Then their favourite Lamb Dinner being prepared.

At which point I take my leave so they can eat in peace.

Sarah shows me out of the main gate.

Sarah shows me out of the main gate.

The sun now setting on Eleanor Rathbone's house.

The sun now setting on Eleanor Rathbone’s house.

And over our road too, 5 o'clock. The afternoons getting lighter at last.

And over our road too. 5 o’clock, the afternoons getting lighter at last.

So there we are. Me and the new camera getting to know each other by walking around. Doing what we’ll always do.

12 thoughts on “Walking with a camera

  1. Stephen

    So enjoyed this post Ronnie, such a feel good factor. I know the places well & of course have met you & Sarah & Bren too. The real beauty here though, for me, is seeing folk in their element, enjoying the simple & most precious things in life. A joy to behold!

    Reply
  2. Cathy Alderson

    Great pics, as always, Ronnie and nice to see one of your Dad, you look so like him!
    I never knew about the brook and it’s relation to the BrookHouse, it just shows, you can live here for 60 years and still learn stuff!

    Reply
    1. Ronnie Hughes Post author

      Thanks all of you for your kindly comments and your warm welcome of the new camera. It’s feeling pretty confident about itself, despite the old cameras mutterings that it hasn’t really done anything very ‘urban’ yet.

      Reply
  3. Open the Curtains

    I really like those tiles! Great start for the camera. I wish it a long and happy career in your hands.

    I always use my camera as a sort of visual note-taker, especially when I’m intending to write about somewhere afterwards. I often take more photos of random things/plants/rocks/found objects because it really helps record the feeling of being somewhere as well as the physical aspects of that place.

    Reply

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s