On Lime Street: The Futurist

DSC03446I do the houses, it’s what I’m best at. And through that I do my best to help with the economy and the quality of life in the place where I live. I have very little time for some of the campaigns to ‘save’ this or that which others get very exercised and excited about. I’ve written before that if I had a year to live, even though they’re ‘quite nice’ I’d put none of my dwindling energies into saving Sefton Park Meadows, as they’re now known. I feel much the same about The Futurist.

But yesterday I was walking along Lime Street and took these photographs. Looking at the closed-road-beleagured place as an analogy for a city struggling with austerity politics.

DSC03447 DSC03450 DSC03452 DSC03453 DSC03454 DSC03455 DSC03456

Guessing we’d all ‘quite like’ to reconstruct Lime Street around the Futurist’s crumbling façade. Wondering what’s actually going on up there with the drilling and the bus diversions? Trusting our City Council is doing its best? Worried about developers and their plans, as ever.DSC03457 DSC03458 DSC03459 DSC03460 DSC03461 DSC03464 DSC03465

As I say, to me it’s not life and death. I do the houses and I help with the economy. I merely wonder what’s going on?DSC03467

5 thoughts on “On Lime Street: The Futurist

  1. Pam

    Surely if it were saveable, the facade of the Futurist would be preferable to the bland frontage which will replace it and which has nothing to do with our heritage. People do come to Liverpool to look at our lovely buildings and I think, as far as cinemas go, that the Futurist is worth saving because it is unusual

    Reply
  2. Sarah

    I could go on and on about this subject. Preserving our heritage and the personality of our cities and towns should be a much higher priority in this country. Instead buildings are left to rot for decades until they are deemed unsafe, then they are pulled down and replaced by cheap prefrab boxes. Town planners through the decades have lain waste to some of our most beautiful and characterful buildings, including rows and rows of Victorian and Georgian houses. I am all for saving the Futurist and similar buildings. Even if only the facade is salvagable, preserve that and build around it. Make the footprint a green space with community artwork and benches. Take a lesson from so many other European cities, including Berlin, a capital city that which had huge areas razed to the ground during WW2, but have endeavoured to preserve what remains of their history – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berlin_Anhalter_Bahnhof
    Rant over

    Reply
    1. Elle Ess

      Sarah, I totally agree with you. Liverpool should be doing all it can to retain it’s beautiful architecture. There are plenty of cities around the world that have managed to blend old and new in a more sympathetic way. Cities that have had the foresight to realise that heritage is preferable to those prefab boxes with zero charm – the only thing they encourage is grafitti and rubbish, not visitors. The May blitz failed to destroy the Futurist, why should the city council/town planners get away with it! And Ronnie, I wish you did care a little more about this subject – what would you have to photograph and blog about if the city were a generic mass of prefab?

      Reply
  3. elainecresswell

    For me, heritage is important to my feelings of identity and half the reason I fell in love with the city (the other was the people). I hope at the very least, the legacy of the futurist and sefton park meadows are to change the process that their demolition was decided on so this was not a forgone conclusion to start with and owners are not allowed to sit on their heritage properties until it really does need to be demolished.

    Reply

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