The Winter Trees

Winter trees - 22The day before this walk we’d all watched in horror as much of the north of England was flooded after days of the heavy rain we’re becoming used to as our climate changes. Thinking about this and after my standard but understandable rant about our useless govermnent, it’s failures on climate change and its fawning over backwards to moneyed interests, I remembered something George Monbiot has written about many times over the past few years, the importance of reforresting our uplands, the importance of trees and their contribution to slowing down the speed with which our denuded sheep farming hills flash off the rainwater which is then sent gushing down into the streets of Appleby, of Whalley, of York, of Hebden Bridge, of Mytholmroyd and then turn the Kirkstall Road in Leeds into a new river.

Anyway, and fortunately for us all up here, today dawned bright, dry and blue so Sarah and I went out for a walk around our relatively dry neighbourhood in Liverpool.

Along Penny Lane.
Along Penny Lane.
Past Eleanor Rathbone's house.
Past Eleanor Rathbone’s house.

Continue reading “The Winter Trees”

In the kitchen

In the kitchen01It’s been a busy week for me. Much talking in cafés. Partly work, partly friendship and what’s the difference anyway? Much riding round on buses of course. Then yesterday in London talking buses, people and mentoring once again at social enterprise HCT. Then I’m working tomorrow, Saturday too. Doing a conference about housing and health at The Bluecoat.

So being a Friday, as is my habit, I’d really like to go out for a walk. Particularly as I need to test out some new memory in my camera.

But all morning it's been raining.
But all morning it’s been raining.
And not just the light, showery rain its a pleasure to walk through.
And not just the light, showery rain its a pleasure to walk through.
But relentless.
But relentless.

Still, I need to make sure this camera’s ok. So I’d better take some pictures here. I decide to take about ‘a roll’. Continue reading “In the kitchen”

Half-life?

For the third of this week’s posts about our holiday on Anglesey we’re going on a walk, on a Nature Trail, unlike any walk either of us has been on before.

The sunshine of the last two idyllic days of cliff walking, lighthouse climbing and wildflower exploring has gone, so it’s a cloudy Monday morning as we set off to walk on this remote Anglesey headland.

Wylfa Head.
Wylfa Head.

That’s at the far end of the headland. The starting point for our Nature Trail looks much more manicured.

Neat lawns, neat notices.
Neat lawns, neat notices.
We set off into the woodland.
We set off into the woodland.

Almost immediately coming across the first clue about the place where we are. Continue reading “Half-life?”

The erosion at Thurstaston

The cliffs at Thurstaston are a thing of great beauty. Made of eroding boulder clay, they are a designated Site of Special Scientific Interest and cannot be protected from erosion – it is the erosion that is important to their status. But the erosion is now proceeding faster than we’ve ever seen because of the extremely heavy rainfall that’s been happening much of the time since last Summer.

If you love Thurstaston cliffs and haven’t seen them for a while, I’d recommend you come for a visit fairly soon, or you might not recognise the cliffs as you remember them.

Last April, a dry cliff.
Last April, a dry cliff.

The yellow colour of the cliffs used to make me think they were sandstone. But I was wrong. And the boulder clay they are made of has got so wet now that they’ve all changed colour. Continue reading “The erosion at Thurstaston”