Tag Archives: erosion

Sarah goes sea kayaking: The Marshlands, by boat

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In which brave Sarah goes out into the more than choppy waters of the Dee Estuary and the boundaries of her comfort zone are well and truly pushed.

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December 2016. The Shining Shore, Dee sailing club slipway visible in the distance.

One of my favourite places in the whole world is ‘The Shining Shore’ – the shining waters and mudflats of the Dee Estuary. Me and Ronnie have walked all along this shore, from Parkgate to West Kirby, and have a default walk which starts at Thurstaston, goes inland  through lanes and woodland, and emerges on the beach and the cliffs at Thurstaston for the last stretch. We’ve done it so many times in the last six years I feel I could probably do it blindfold. We also walk further up the shore, further inland where the marsh is gradually encroaching, and we call that part ‘The Marshlands’. And yet each time we walk here there is always something to see – wildflowers, the change in the light, the birds in the estuary…. Here’s a selection of photographs of this part of the world from the last five years.

Over the years we’ve observed the cliffs erode, the marsh becoming larger. And the tidal flow in and out of the cut through the marsh. During our years of walking I didn’t imagine that I would enter the marsh through this cut. But this weekend I did. Continue reading

The Winter Trees and The Flock of Curlews

dsc07926Two days after Christmas it is cold but still and a good day for walking. So Sarah and I drive over to the far side of the Wirral and do our favourite walk, our favourite meditation. It’s The Shining Shore walk and I’ve written about it many times on here before. So today I won’t write about the walk so much as a few observations on the way round. And some more pictures of those curlews.

Setting off late morning more or less in silence.

Setting off late morning more or less in silence in our familiar place.

We gather some company along the way.

We gather some company along the way.

Continue reading

Breathing Free: On the Shining Shore

After Saturday’s revealing walk around the poor selection of breathing spaces in Liverpool City Centre, on Sunday we headed across the river to one of our favourite places for walking, sitting and just being, Wirral’s Shining Shore around Thurstaston. So as the working week here in the city gets underway, here’s how things are just a few miles away, where springtime is starting.

Setting off inland from where the railway station used to be.

Setting off inland from where the railway station used to be.

Leucojeum, or Summer Snowdrop.

Leucojum, or Summer Snowdrop.

Hawthorn coming into leaf.

Hawthorn coming into leaf.

Continue reading

One Shiny Day

With Sarah on the Shining Shore, 20th January 2016.

With Sarah on the Shining Shore, 20th January 2016.

So far this year here in the North of England that picture could only have been taken on one day, yesterday. A day that also happened to be my birthday.

So we got well wrapped up and went on our favourite walk.

So we got well wrapped up and went on our favourite walk.

Here at Thurstaston in West Wirral.

Here at Thurstaston in West Wirral.

Continue reading

East of Hull – Keeping Spurn Wild

So then, what’s East of Hull? ‘Rotterdam?’ I hear you ask. Well yes, but before you get there is the strange, flat, watery, eroding and beautiful place where Sarah’s just stayed.

“Sarah Horton here, reporting from a recent trip to ‘the end of the world’, as I described the Spurn peninsula to Ronnie! ‘Spurn,’ you say, ‘where’s that then?’ Well it’s what’s to the east of Hull, and it’s one of the strangest and loveliest places I’ve ever visited. Read on for more.

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I’m the sort of person who likes time alone, always have been. My work as a funeral celebrant is demanding and challenging, so I’ll often take time away to recharge. Right now, I’m not working, as I’ve been involved in a road traffic accident with a big truck, leaving me without a car, shaken, vulnerable, and in need of some time to recover. Feeling a bit restless after four weeks of rest, physio and emotional support, I’m ready to step back into the world – very gently – and see what that feels like. Continue reading

The Shining

A Friday Walk then, in all but name, as it’s happening on a Saturday. And a walk done so many times it’s become a meditation now. The Shining Shore.The Shining01Taking place in the lanes around Thurstaston on the far side of the Wirral, I’ve not been here since last March. Mostly urban walking in Liverpool since then. But we’re both off work today and it’s good to get out here together on holiday.

Still wintry here, the long hedge in Station Road completely bare.

Still wintry here, the long hedge in Station Road completely bare.

But for a few left over berries too bitter even for the winter birds.

But for a few left over berries too bitter even for the winter birds.

Continue reading

High Tides and Green Grass: A Friday Walk

Unusually for a Friday Walk Sarah was able to come on this one, a brief gap in her funeral work occurring on a Friday for once.  So, having access to the car that Sarah’s usually out in, we headed for the Wirral coastline to see how it’s been coping with the recent storms and extreme high tides, which even our slippery Tory leader now accepts are something to do with global climate change.

We'll get to the high tides in a bit, but first we head inland.

We’ll get to the high tides in a bit, but first we head inland.

This is Station Road in Thurstaston, so called as it used to lead to a railway station, long gone. It’s also evidence of land enclosure, the greedy 17th to 19th century rich drawing straight lines on maps and saying ‘This bit can be mine and that bit’s yours.’ They did it all over Africa too, you can see by the borders on maps.

At this time of year the mile long hedges are almost empty.

At this time of year the mile long hedges are almost empty.

A few hawthorn berries left.

A few hawthorn berries left.

And white briony berries.

And black bryony berries. Poisonous to us and not too popular with birds either by the looks of things.

Yes I know, the flowers that are white, the berries are red and it’s called ‘black’. I didn’t make this nomenclature thing up. Continue reading