Tag Archives: St Bartholomew’s Church Thurstaston

Wirral West and its Shining Shore

Having spent much of yesterday afternoon and evening in Wirral West, as one of the many people there helping the local Labour candidate Margaret Greenwood get elected, I decide to go back to the constituency today, as I take a day off from all forms of working.

It’s such a beautiful place.

Always my favourite place for reflective, meditative walks.

Today I’m reflecting on my happiness that Jeremy Corbyn and his supporters did such a good job and reintroduced ‘being yourself’ into a political system where that’s been thoroughly yet pointlessly discouraged for years.

It’s early summertime in the sandstone walls.

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A Wirral Meditation

I tell myself I’ve come here to think something through. Something I’ve been thinking about that could do with a walk to get it straight. But as soon as I arrive I know the place isn’t going to put up with that. Because the place itself wants to be noticed. And in the noticing my nagging thoughts melt away. Which is probably what I’ve really come here for anyway.

I’m on the Shining Shore, the walk around Thurstaston that’s been one of my main meditation places, alone and with Sarah, for many years now.

It’s a grey day.

But it’s Springtime anyway.

I’m in the middle of my week and a half of not working and I’ve come for an afternoon out on the Wirral. Some walking, some reading and my lunch is in my bag. Continue reading

Breathing Free: On the Shining Shore

After Saturday’s revealing walk around the poor selection of breathing spaces in Liverpool City Centre, on Sunday we headed across the river to one of our favourite places for walking, sitting and just being, Wirral’s Shining Shore around Thurstaston. So as the working week here in the city gets underway, here’s how things are just a few miles away, where springtime is starting.

Setting off inland from where the railway station used to be.

Setting off inland from where the railway station used to be.

Leucojeum, or Summer Snowdrop.

Leucojum, or Summer Snowdrop.

Hawthorn coming into leaf.

Hawthorn coming into leaf.

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One Shiny Day

With Sarah on the Shining Shore, 20th January 2016.

With Sarah on the Shining Shore, 20th January 2016.

So far this year here in the North of England that picture could only have been taken on one day, yesterday. A day that also happened to be my birthday.

So we got well wrapped up and went on our favourite walk.

So we got well wrapped up and went on our favourite walk.

Here at Thurstaston in West Wirral.

Here at Thurstaston in West Wirral.

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Wildflowers and pirates: Our day on the Wirral

If you’ve been around here for a while you’ll recall the practical help offered by ‘The Wirral: A guide for Liverpool people.’ That provided useful instructions on how to get to a place where many Liverpool people have simply never been. And then some handy hints about what to do when you get there. View this as Part 2. More information about the delights of the Wirral. And further handy hints about what Liverpool people can get up to over there.

The imposing sea wall at Harrison Drive on the Wirral. Like a Mark Rothko painting.

The imposing sea wall at Harrison Drive on the Wirral. Like a Mark Rothko painting.

All of this guidance put together by us two Liverpool people in one day, yesterday. Sarah has a brief gap in her funeral work and I, as ever, am always keen on walking about rather than working. Continue reading

The still and silent Shining Shore

Our ‘home’ walk, our meditation. Though over two months since we last walked it. But taking advantage of the lighter afternoons and the fact that Sarah has time to spare from her funeral work, we arrive at Thurstaston in the middle of a mid-March Thursday.

All is still and silent.

All is still and silent.

The heavy mist blankets everything. Wetting hair and branches and leaves. Deadening distant sounds, so nearby birdsongs, footsteps and water tricklings appear louder.

During the winter the long hedge on Station Road has been decisively cut back.

During the winter the long hedge on Station Road has been decisively cut back.

So we can see over the top of it into the misty middle distance.

So we can see over the top of it into the misty middle distance.

The day is cold, walking through the mist. And looks like we’re back in mid-winter. Continue reading

High Tides and Green Grass: A Friday Walk

Unusually for a Friday Walk Sarah was able to come on this one, a brief gap in her funeral work occurring on a Friday for once.  So, having access to the car that Sarah’s usually out in, we headed for the Wirral coastline to see how it’s been coping with the recent storms and extreme high tides, which even our slippery Tory leader now accepts are something to do with global climate change.

We'll get to the high tides in a bit, but first we head inland.

We’ll get to the high tides in a bit, but first we head inland.

This is Station Road in Thurstaston, so called as it used to lead to a railway station, long gone. It’s also evidence of land enclosure, the greedy 17th to 19th century rich drawing straight lines on maps and saying ‘This bit can be mine and that bit’s yours.’ They did it all over Africa too, you can see by the borders on maps.

At this time of year the mile long hedges are almost empty.

At this time of year the mile long hedges are almost empty.

A few hawthorn berries left.

A few hawthorn berries left.

And white briony berries.

And black bryony berries. Poisonous to us and not too popular with birds either by the looks of things.

Yes I know, the flowers that are white, the berries are red and it’s called ‘black’. I didn’t make this nomenclature thing up. Continue reading