We’re all light

I love all of the days and times of the year, but particularly this one. The throw the doors open, let the light in, eat outside, springtime. Like the first time you heard ‘Up town top ranking’ or ‘One day like this’ it gets me every time. The upsurging joy of spring.

Some of it though is so fleeting or so tiny that you can easily miss moments and wildflowers if you’re not looking for them. I’ve been looking for them, together with Sarah. And here are a few our cameras have gathered in.

Like last night as it finally grew dark I went over to draw the curtains and saw this, in the Liverpool sky to my west.

The Moon, Aldebaran and Venus.

The Moon, Aldebaran and Venus.

Sarah tells me that in asronomy this is known as an ‘occultation.’ Aldebaran at the bottom there (the bright star 54 times the size of our own Sun) is either emerging from or about to be hidden behind our Moon. So there.All Light - 38

But even better is the not dark sky of the springtime Northern Hemisphere. So much more light every day that flowers are blooming everywhere you look.

In the hedgerows.

In the hedgerows.

Where the hawthorn is coming into leaf.

Where the hawthorn is coming into leaf.

Leocojeum, the 'big snowdrops'

Leucojum, the ‘big snowdrops’

Over a garden wall.

Over a garden wall.

Magnolia at St Bartholomew's, Thurstaston.

Magnolia at St Bartholomew’s, Thurstaston.

Precious life, to fight a war and die so near the end of it.

Precious life, to fight a war and die so near the end of it.

Precious life.

Precious life.

The bluebells of May are nearly here.

The bluebells of May are nearly here.

All is well.

All is well.

And the blackthorn?

And the blackthorn?

Blossoming.

Blossoming.

To Sarah's intense delight.

To Sarah’s intense delight.

The maybush? Already here.

The maybush? Already here.

Give me life.

Give me life.

Give me shelter.

Give me shelter.

And I will look up to the light.

And I will look up to the light.

The shoreline is full of wading birds.

The shoreline is full of wading birds.

And blossoming blackthorn.

And blossoming blackthorn.

The Shining Shore.

The Shining Shore.

In springtime we are all as children. reborn after dark winter.

In springtime we are all as children. Reborn after dark winter.

The tracks of the periwinkles, clinging on for the next tide.

The tracks of the periwinkles, clinging on for the next tide.

Dog violet.

Dog violet.

Magnificent every time, the Dee Estuary.

Magnificent every time, the Dee Estuary.

And the joy of ice cream at Nicholl's in Parkgate.

And the joy of ice cream at Nicholl’s in Parkgate.

Meanwhile on her allotment, Sarah's got a shiny new jug.

Meanwhile on her allotment, Sarah’s got a shiny new jug.

And the tulips, from tiny red species to big pink giants, are in radiant flower.All Light - 27 All Light - 37 All Light - 36 All Light - 35 All Light - 34 All Light - 33 All Light - 31 All Light - 30 All Light - 29 All Light - 28And the new moon rises.All Light - 39

Then the morning dawns with new cut flowers in the house, just a few.

Then the morning dawns with new cut flowers in the house, just a few.

We’re all light and everthing feels like it’s turning its face up to the sun. In 3 weeks time the joy and optimism of springtime will help us elect a government willing to work intelligently with all of us, not just the rich, to make life better for us all, to end the joyless austerity and bring the colour back into all of our lives.If the planets and the stars and the flowers can do it, then so can the humans.

To end then, a song from XTC?

3 thoughts on “We’re all light

  1. John summers

    Captain VICTOR FEODOR LORISOVITCH ROUGEAULT -CENIAVINE (1928Lancashire Fusiliers Born 20 March 1918, Victor Rougeault and his elder brother, Rolf, were the sons of a Master at the School in the ‘twenties’ – the last of the ‘foreign masters’ engaged to teach modern languages.

    Writing in One in Heart, WE Woodhouse said of Rougeault pere:

    ‘He was a character in the true sense of the word. In private life a devoted husband and father with a heart of gold. As a schoolmaster in an English school he failed to comprehend the inanities of his flock, even though he assured them that he was the father of an English family!’ Previously in the Prep and at first a day boy, Victor Rougeault finished up in School House and as a talented cellist was much in demand at School concerts. On leaving School he joined the offices of the Elder Dempster Line. He was given an Emergency commission in the Lancashire Fusiliers on 19 October 1940 and, after training in Scotland, by August 1944 he was a Captain. Posted overseas to the Malta garrison he was first injured by bomb blast and then suffered severe spinal and head injuries in a training exercise and some six months later, after re-patriation to U.K. he died in Winwick Hospital, Lancashire, on 31 May 1945. He is buried in Thurstaston churchyard. On leaving School, Rougeault adopted the name to which his father had reverted on receiving British citizenship, namely Rougeault-Ceniavine.That is the correct spelling in the Roll of Honour of The Lancashire Fusiliers, but it was sometimes Geniavine in the Army List.

    Reply
  2. lindsay53

    Beautiful post, Ronnie and Sarah. Yes, the abundance of spring creeps up on you and then bursts out all over the place. It is just the same here and the abundance is keeping me very busy. Plants are jostling with weeds and things that have lost their labels start to push through the earth to my great delight. I am always amazed by how the natural world bounces back each Spring, no matter what might have been thrown at it in the previous months. It is such a source of joy and calm and yes, it does give hope that we humans can learn to imitate nature. Not holding my breath for the election though!

    Reply

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