Outstanding Natural Beauty

dsc06674The last morning of our stay here in Cornwall and it’s a sunny one.

So we set off walking along the cliffs to the south of St Ives.

So we set off walking along the cliffs to the south of St Ives.

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Looking back on new views of the town as we go.

Looking back on new views of the town as we go.

Along the Cornish Coastal path.

Along the Cornish Coastal path.

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Ragged Robin.

Ragged Robin.

Two against nature.

Two against nature.

(It’s an old tradition of ours.)dsc06678 dsc06679

Leaving the path.

Leaving the path.

And across the springy grass.

And across the springy grass.

Sea Thrift.

Sea Thrift.

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We once walked all the way along there.

We once walked all the way along there.

To Zennor.

To Zennor.

A fairly long and sometimes tough walk, as parts of the path were eroded then.

A fairly long and sometimes tough walk, as parts of the path were eroded then.

Not today though, this is as far as we go.

Not today though, this is as far as we go.

Time for more of that.

Time for more of that.

Also, Sarah’s brought her small tripod and sets her camera up for a photo of both of us here:

And here it is, on Sarah's camera.

And here it is, on Sarah’s camera.

We set off back to St Ives.

We set off back to St Ives.

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Passing the perfect bowling green.

Passing the perfect bowling green.

Beautiful enough to make me take up bowls if I lived here.

Beautiful enough to make me take up bowls if I lived here.

Founded just before me.

Founded just before me.

And that’s just about it. We’ve loved being here in this outstandingly beautiful place, despite our concerns for how the people who actually live here are getting on. Living as they are in an economy largely dictated by outsiders. Not occasional holiday makers like ourselves, but permanent presences in the local economy through the empty homes they swan down to for occasional weekends.

But I had my say on that the other day and so mainly want to say how lovely it’s been to have time off together here in this outstandingly beautiful place. Thank you Cornwall and thank you the actual people of St Ives.

Before we leave though we’ve one more thing to do.

We want to go and visit Barbara Hepworth.

We want to go and visit Barbara Hepworth.

And that will be one very special blog post that I’ll put together when we get back to Liverpool. I’m sat here now with 100 or so photographs of an afternoon spent in the artist’s house and garden and peering through the windows of her studio. And I could just splurge it all out at you. But I don’t want to. I want to make something beautiful and considered. 

See also the other posts from Cornwall this week:
A Post Card From Cornwall
All is quiet here in Cornwall, too quiet?

Cathy’s Walk

 

3 thoughts on “Outstanding Natural Beauty

  1. robertday154

    Your comment about the people who live full-time in Cornwall but who are at the mercy of the fashions of incomers makes me think of my sister. She and her husband live just a bit up-county from where you’ve been, a bit inland from Bude. Her husband was a teacher, but he had to take early retirement on health grounds; she was then the main breadwinner, taking in domestic jobs and other casual work wherever she could. (She’s now retired, being older than me.)

    When my father died, my sister had to come up so we could do all the probate stuff, and whilst she was here, the head boss of our Department retired and threw a garden party, in the posh end of Birmingham. So I took Lorraine along, and it was all champagne and canapés in a marquee in the back garden of a pretty posh place in Edgbaston. We bumped into my former line manager, our one-time Senior Press Officer, and she was a lady with a very upper-crust background. She’d moved on to another job and I’d not seen her for a while, so I asked what she’d been up to, and she told me about doing consultancy work for the South African government, and how she’d stopped off on the way back in Nairobi to see some old friends and to go up Kilimanjaro. Then she turned to my sister and asked “And what do you do?”

    Lorraine, picking up on this woman’s airs and graces said, loftily, “Oh, I Live in Cornwall…” And after a bit more small talk, my ex-manager flounced away. At which Lorraine turned to me and said “I could hardly say ‘I clean houses for people like you.’..”

    Reply
  2. Nick McGinn

    I have long thought that the outstanding beauty to be found in nature is very strong evidence for the existence of a creator. Firstly, why would a process of evolution lead to the beauty to be found in nature and, secondly, why would it lead to us being here at this point in an evolutionary process with the aesthetic sensibility to enjoy and appreciate it?

    Reply

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